Monthly Archives: June 2006

Response to llary52

llary52 left a comment on David Warlick’s 2 Cents Worth blog about the flexibility NCLB gives states in the way they assess students. NCLB allows all kinds of assessment – just not the assessments that are the most valuable for … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

What Would You Say To Margaret Spellings?

In the July/August edition of Edutopia’s “Sage Advice” section they ask the question: You’re sitting next to U.S. education secretary Margaret Spellings at a dinner party. What do you say to her? My response – Ms. Spellings in a speech … Continue reading

Posted in Change, Education, Messy Learning, Project Based | 2 Comments

Have Too Many Lost The Passion?

in this day of testing, programmed/scripted teaching what we are missing is the passion. How do you consistently get students revved-up if you are not excited about what you are teaching? When you think back at your own school experience … Continue reading

Posted in Blogging, Change, Education, Literacy, Messy Learning, Project Based, Student Access, Technology | 5 Comments

One of the Best Investments We Could Make!

One of the biggest mistakes we made in this country was when we cut school sports programs – especially elementary school sports programs. When I was in elementary school, starting in fourth grade, we had after-school team sports – baseball, … Continue reading

Posted in Change, Messy Learning, Student Access | 4 Comments

Change – Start a Ripple

Miguel Guhlin in his post Pearls On A String, approaches the issue of initiating education reform by advocating for change in each one of us as opposed to trying to – “effect change across complex organizations.” I agree. At this … Continue reading

Posted in Change, Education, Technology | 1 Comment

Your Child’s Dream Best School Day – What Does It Look Like? What Should It Be?

There is much rumination in the edblogosphere about what education and schools should look like in this way or that. Kids should be blogging, using web 2.0 applications (Wikis, podcasts, Flickr, the flavor-of-the-week app), in conjuction with project-based, problem-based learning. … Continue reading

Posted in Blogging, Brian Crosby, Change, Cooperative Learning, Digital Video, Education, Email, Field Trips, Literacy, Messy Learning, Project Based, Student Access, Technology | 3 Comments

Messy Learning Examples

I mentioned in an earlier post that some of the most important learning that happens isn’t part of your lesson plan because you can’t account for everything that MIGHT happen during a project. Here are some recent examples from our … Continue reading

Posted in Cooperative Learning, Digital Video, Education, Field Trips, Literacy, Messy Learning, Project Based, Student Access, Technology | 1 Comment

No Time For… _________________ ?

Wes Fryer’s post “No Time For Technology In High Schools” follows up other tirades he has made about no time for recess and other areas now deemed “less important.” He states: NO TIME. No time for projects, no time for … Continue reading

Posted in Change, Education, Messy Learning, Project Based, Student Access | 1 Comment

Some of the Messy Parts of learning – Or What We Did After Testing

Diatoms, 3500x magnification, taken with scanning electron microscope, University of Nevada, Reno – by John Kevin McCormack When I was first exposed to the idea of having students do project work, I remember the presenters saying that it was the … Continue reading

Posted in Cooperative Learning, Digital Video, Education, Field Trips, Literacy, Project Based, Student Access, Technology | 1 Comment

So As Parents and Educators We Monitor and Teach Ethical, Appropriate, Safe Use

The following was written in response to Will Richardson’s request for a message to parents about safe and appropriate technology use: Paper and pencils can be used to draw inappropriate, hate filled, pictures messages and ideas – and you could … Continue reading

Posted in Blogging, Digital Video, Education, Email, Literacy, Student Access, Technology | 1 Comment