"High-scoring nations on an international exam say success stems from autonomy, project-based learning”

I’ve noted lately there seem to be more and more studies and reports like this one. Check out this quote:

“A delegation led by the Consortium for School Networking (CoSN) recently toured Scandinavia in search of answers for how students in that region of the world were able to score so high on a recent international test of math and science skills. They found that educators in Finland, Sweden, and Denmark all cited autonomy, project-based learning, and nationwide broadband internet access as keys to their success.”

Here’s a link to the article in eSchoolnews:

U.S. educators seek lessons from Scandinavia
High-scoring nations on an international exam say success stems from autonomy, project-based learning
By Meris Stansbury, Assistant Editor, eSchool News

What they didn’t find is just as interesting:

“What the CoSN delegation didn’t find in those nations were competitive grading, standardized testing, and top-down accountability—all staples of the American education system.”

Makes you want to find out more huh?!

Learning is messy!

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2 Responses to "High-scoring nations on an international exam say success stems from autonomy, project-based learning”

  1. Jim says:

    Just got my NEA magazine and enjoyed reading about you and your class. It got me thinking on how I might grab some laptops and attempt the same thing. I know it would be a tough road to haul but I just might be able to do it.

    Thanks for sharing your journey.

    :)

  2. Dave Winter says:

    It is nice to see teachers putting their opinions forward as to what is working. Recently Spoke to Mark Treadwell a NZ educational leader who was saying the world doesn’t have enough smart people. In Denmark my nice and nephew attended a Forrest kindergarten. there the students spent most of their time outdoors at an early age. There are probably an countless number of things we can do to improve comparative scores. the most important would have to be in the area of student engagement, realistic challenge and thinking about how we learn How We Learn

    10% of what we READ

    20% of what we HEAR

    30% of what we SEE

    50% of what we SEE and HEAR

    70% of what is DISCUSSED with OTHERS

    80% of what is EXPERIENCED PERSONALLY

    95% of what we TEACH TO SOMEONE ELSE

    William Glasser

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