Embed of My TEDx Talk

You’ll have to pardon me here. I originally meant to embed this video in my last post, but at the time I was at the airport and couldn’t make it work, so here is my TEDxDenver ED presentation embeded … unless of course it doesn’t work … again. I would have just replaced my last post, but there were a few comments and I didn’t want to just delete them. Now I have learned how to embed video in my blog … which for some reason I had never done before. So, learning really is messy:

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16 Responses to Embed of My TEDx Talk

  1. Jim Gates says:

    Brian,

    Just wanted to let you know that we’re going to be having our grad class (there are three of us teaching it in different locations at the same time) watch your video and comment. We’ve been having the discussion about blogs with students, and this is going to really get them excited about the possibilities.

    BTW – your joke about the possibilities of explosions and butts and not getting any better for 4th graders was perfect! :-)

  2. Brian says:

    Thanks Jim! LOL – I just remembered we talked about how I might handle that! Will be interested in how your class reacts!
    Brian

  3. AllanahK says:

    It embedded fine in my blog as well. Thanks for providing us with another avenue for spreading the word on how we might work together to improve outcomes for children.

  4. Brian says:

    Allanah – thanks – when I was designing my talk I really had that in mind … a model for what we could be doing … not that I have THE model … but wouldn’t it be great if we had more chances to try out a model like this, but even better for schools?
    Brian

  5. Melissa says:

    I loved watching this video! As a teacher of an urban, lower SES population in a school that is a hub for ELL students, I could really connect with what you were showing & saying. Thanks for demonstrating for teachers that all students have schema, it’s just not the same middle class background that most teachers have. More importantly, we can provide our students with the schema they need with hands on, real world experiences in the classroom. That’s my goal each day at school, & it’s exciting to see it happening in other schools across the country!

  6. Congrats… a fantastic speech from a wonderful teacher!

  7. Thank you! You can be sure that the kids are thanking you too.

  8. John Strange says:

    My students in EDM310 at the University of South Alabama will be assigned this video to watch and comment upon next semester. We will also add your students to our list of Comments4Kids. Thank you so much.

  9. This video is amazing! It wasn’t an assignment for the summer semester but Dr. Strange recommended it and I’m glad I watched it. You have made a difference and I think every teacher can do that if they would take the time to. You know those students will never forget you because you made such a difference. Great job!!

  10. Gina Pace says:

    Hi Brian,

    I really enjoyed watching the projects that your students did. Your assignments are “student-centered and geared toward student success. I liked your idea of having your students write from the perspective of the balloon. I’m sure they thought that this was just a “fun” activity but this was definitely higher order thinking here. Your enthusiasm and creativity seems to spark creativity in your students, you are definitely setting high hopes for your students. Your initiative, enthusiasm, and dedication causes you to be a meaningful and motivational force in the lives of your students. Thank you for honoring our students as a vital part of this great universe. I am a student of Dr. Strange’s EDM 310 class. To learn more about me, click on the following link Gina’s Blog

  11. Pete Hanson says:

    I saved your TEDxDenverEd presentation until I started getting ready for the school year. I loved how you showed the way web 2.0 tools can have such an incredible impact in student learning. Second language learners shouldn’t have to master other skills in order to use computers, blog, skype etc (which, sadly, is the case in many places). Nice work!

  12. Pingback: Passion-based learning in action: Brian Crosby at TEDxDenverEd « Moving at the Speed of Creativity

  13. Pingback: Teaching With Passion | Global Teacher - Blog Directory and Web 3.0 Community

  14. Tracie Weisz says:

    Bravo! I’m giving you a cyber standing ovation! The name of your blog says it all, but you’ve delivered a decidedly “un-messy” message. Love it!

  15. All I can say is, “Wow!” What an amazing lesson. You have detailed a blueprint that other science teachers can follow and adapt to their own needs. Thank you so much for such a clear and detailed description of the project and all the connections to so many educational applications. I intend to share this out. I am literally blown-away. This video has so many threads for us to follow up on! It gives us so much more than the description of an interactive science experiment.

  16. Phillip Hall says:

    Mr. Crosby,

    My name is Phillip Hall and I am a student at the University of South Alabama. I am taking EDM 310 with Dr. Strange. Thanks so much for allowing us the opportunity to watch this video. As a physical education major, the high hopes lesson is one that I will definitely use when I become a teacher. I think the main thing I received from your video is that technology helps to put students on a fair playing ground when it comes to education. Your students are very lucky to have you as a teacher for three years. Again, thanks for sharing.

    Phillip

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